23 y.o. Biologist and speech therapist. Russian.
I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally draws ugly owls.

 

shatterwing123:

HAVE YOU GUYS EVER SEEN THE ARTIST OF THE JAPANESE GUARDIANS OF GA’HOOLE BOOKS

I MEAN THIS

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AND LYZE’S GOGGLE MASK

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IT’S JUST

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HE’S DRAWING FOR WOLVES OF THE BEYOND TOO I CAN’T EVEN

rhamphotheca:

ABC Bird of the Week:  Chuck-Will’s-Widow
Chuck-will’s-widow belongs to a family of birds with the folk name “goatsuckers.” The family name, Caprimulgidae, literally means “milker of goats” and is based on an ancient belief that the birds milked goats with their enormous mouths each night.
In reality, the birds’ attraction to livestock was likely due to the presence of insects. Chuck-will’s-widow forages at dusk and dawn, silently swooping over the ground in search of prey. Specialized feathers known as rictal bristles help funnel insects into the bird’s mouth, which is so large that they may occasionally swallow small birds and bats as well!
The “chuck” is the largest nightjar in North America and is almost entirely nocturnal. During the day, the birds roost along tree branches or on the ground, where their beautifully mottled brown plumage provides perfect camouflage against dried leaves and tree bark…
(read more: American Bird Conservancy)
photo by Dick Snell

rhamphotheca:

ABC Bird of the Week:  Chuck-Will’s-Widow

Chuck-will’s-widow belongs to a family of birds with the folk name “goatsuckers.” The family name, Caprimulgidae, literally means “milker of goats” and is based on an ancient belief that the birds milked goats with their enormous mouths each night.

In reality, the birds’ attraction to livestock was likely due to the presence of insects. Chuck-will’s-widow forages at dusk and dawn, silently swooping over the ground in search of prey. Specialized feathers known as rictal bristles help funnel insects into the bird’s mouth, which is so large that they may occasionally swallow small birds and bats as well!

The “chuck” is the largest nightjar in North America and is almost entirely nocturnal. During the day, the birds roost along tree branches or on the ground, where their beautifully mottled brown plumage provides perfect camouflage against dried leaves and tree bark…

(read more: American Bird Conservancy)

photo by Dick Snell

mokacahuete:

Stourne bronzé ou Merle bronzé de Panay - Asian Glossy Starling - Estornino bronceado - (Aplonis panayensis). -  Frank Carey
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/
¤

mokacahuete:

Stourne bronzé ou Merle bronzé de Panay - Asian Glossy Starling - Estornino bronceado - (Aplonis panayensis). -  Frank Carey

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

¤

mokacahuete:

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Red Eyes by blackANDwhite99) *Asian Glossy Starling

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Stourne bronzé ou Merle bronzé de Panay - Estornino bronceado - (Aplonis panayensis).

mokacahuete:

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Red Eyes by blackANDwhite99)
*Asian Glossy Starling

§

Stourne bronzé ou Merle bronzé de Panay - Estornino bronceado - (Aplonis panayensis).